The Hollies Music Group 1960s
The Hollies Music Group 1960s
Photos: 161
Subscribers: 122
Views: 110
Uploaded: Feb 16 2022
Photos: 161
Subscribers: 122
My Favorite!
Report
Share This Photo — cancel

Flag This Photo — cancel

Select the category that most closely reflects your concerns so we can review it and determine if it violates the Society Guidelines
Description
'Like most of their contemporaries in the British beat boom, the Hollies found their earliest influences in American rhythm-and-blues artists. Their first hits in the United Kingdom, in 1963–64, were with cover versions of the Coasters’ “(Ain’t That) Just Like Me” and “Searchin’,” Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs’ “Stay,” and Doris Troy’s “Just One Look.” Under the influence of Bob Dylan, however, their approach broadened, including diluted elements of folk music, to the particular benefit of Clarke. A strong lead singer, he received fine support from the harmony singing of Hicks, Nash, and, after the latter’s departure in 1968, Sylvester on “Here I Go Again” (1964), “I’m Alive” (1965), “Bus Stop” (1966, their first entry into the American top 10), and “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother” (1969). At their best the Hollies established a clear balance between the various components at play in their music, developing (like their Liverpool contemporaries the Searchers) a style that provided a useful template for a new generation of power pop groups, many of them American, such as the Raspberries and the Rubinoos. Unlike most groups of their vintage, the Hollies had their greatest successes in the 1970s, with “Long Cool Woman (in a Black Dress)” (1972) and “The Air That I Breathe” (1974). The group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2010.'
Britannica.com
Comments (0)
Views: 110
Uploaded: Feb 16 2022
Photos: 161
Subscribers: 122
Description
'Like most of their contemporaries in the British beat boom, the Hollies found their earliest influences in American rhythm-and-blues artists. Their first hits in the United Kingdom, in 1963–64, were with cover versions of the Coasters’ “(Ain’t That) Just Like Me” and “Searchin’,” Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs’ “Stay,” and Doris Troy’s “Just One Look.” Under the influence of Bob Dylan, however, their approach broadened, including diluted elements of folk music, to the particular benefit of Clarke. A strong lead singer, he received fine support from the harmony singing of Hicks, Nash, and, after the latter’s departure in 1968, Sylvester on “Here I Go Again” (1964), “I’m Alive” (1965), “Bus Stop” (1966, their first entry into the American top 10), and “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother” (1969). At their best the Hollies established a clear balance between the various components at play in their music, developing (like their Liverpool contemporaries the Searchers) a style that provided a useful template for a new generation of power pop groups, many of them American, such as the Raspberries and the Rubinoos. Unlike most groups of their vintage, the Hollies had their greatest successes in the 1970s, with “Long Cool Woman (in a Black Dress)” (1972) and “The Air That I Breathe” (1974). The group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2010.'
Britannica.com