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Views: 139
Uploaded: 3 months ago
 
Shadakshari Lokeshvara, the supreme soul (‘ishvara’) of the realm of existence (‘loka’) wherein it thrives, is a manifestation of the six (‘shad’) syllables (‘akshara’) of om-mani-Padme-hum, is a form of the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. He is mentioned in the sixth form of the Sadhanamala. The name Chenrezig has its origin in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. A solemn, bitone sculptu
Shadakshari Lokeshvara, the supreme soul (‘ishvara’) of the realm of existence (‘loka’) wher
Views: 139
Uploaded: 3 months ago
 
Views: 132
Uploaded: 6 months ago
 
Shadakshari Lokeshvara, the supreme soul (‘ishvara’) of the realm of existence (‘loka’) wherein it thrives, a manifestation of the six (‘shad’) syllables (‘akshara’) of om-mani-Padme-hm, is a form of the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. He is mentioned in the sixth form of the Sadhanamala. The name Chenrezig has its origin in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. A solemn, bitone sculpture o
Shadakshari Lokeshvara, the supreme soul (‘ishvara’) of the realm of existence (‘loka’) wher
Views: 132
Uploaded: 6 months ago
 
Views: 127
Uploaded: 6 months ago
 
Amoghapasha, which means "unfailing lasso," alludes to lasso-like compassion that brings all sentient creatures out of sorrow and into a state of happiness that leads to enlightenment. In Tantric Buddhist imagery, Amoghapasha is a convoluted god. In most creative renditions, he is easily confused with Avalokiteshvara. Scholars frequently confuse the two deities. When Avalokiteshvara is t
Amoghapasha, which means "unfailing lasso," alludes to lasso-like compassion that brings a
Views: 127
Uploaded: 6 months ago
 
Views: 100
Uploaded: 5 months ago
 
This forty inches high and twenty-six-inch wide brass image represents one of the early forms of Manjushri, the Buddhist god who stands for wisdom and knowledge, more particularly the knowledge of linguistics and grammar. The image of the deity, with its two arms and the book Prajnaparamita, carried over a lotus, pursues the initial idiom of Manjushri imagery. One of the would-be Buddhas, Manjushr
This forty inches high and twenty-six-inch wide brass image represents one of the early forms of Man
Views: 100
Uploaded: 5 months ago
 
Views: 52
Uploaded: 3 months ago
 
This forty-inch high and twenty-six-inch wide brass image represents one of the early forms of Manjushri, the Buddhist god who stands for wisdom and knowledge, more particularly the knowledge of linguistics and grammar. The image of the deity, with its two arms and the book Prajnaparmita, carried over a lotus, pursues the initial idiom of Manjushri imagery. One of the would-be Buddhas, Manjushri a
This forty-inch high and twenty-six-inch wide brass image represents one of the early forms of Manju
Views: 52
Uploaded: 3 months ago